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This genre reflected the need of a people in a specific situation at a specific period in time." [Art Abstracts] "Down These Seen Streets A Man Must Go: Siegfried Kracauer, Hollywood's Terror Films and the Spatiality of Film Noir." New German Critique: An Interdisciplinary Journal of German Studies. One reason for their popularity is their attempt to replace reason with subtle fantasies.

In the so-called Weimar Germany period, the cinema formed a part of popular culture.

Eisner; [translated from the French by Roger Greaves]. Der historische Spielfilm im Nationalsozialismus / Hans-Gerd Happel. The newsreels determine the image of the Third Reich that we have in our minds today, since they form the basis for nearly all the popular historical programs on television.

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These contributors add considerably to the knowledge about the structure and organizations of the Third Reich newsreel empire, newsreel production history, and, most important, a consideration of newsreel reception.

Newsreels also of themselves provide a valuable historical source for understanding the period in which they were produced and shown, in this case the war, and in particular the relationship between propaganda and public opinion. 647-54, Oct 2005 "Nazi newsreels in Europe, 1939-1945: the many faces of Ufa's foreign weekly newsreel ( Auslandstonwoche ) versus German's weekly newsreel ( Deutsche Wochenschau)." Historical Journal of Film, Radio & Television, Mar2004, Vol.

Most historians involved with Third Reich film have concerned themselves with propaganda, which is not unexpected, in view of their interest in the state and the fact that Third Reich film (of all varieties)-either overtly or covertly in numerous ways-promoted the interests of the state.

But given this interest in propaganda, the neglect of newsreels, which formed part of the Third Reich cinema program, is all the more surprising.

The Weimar cinema was considered as an avant-garde involving figures such as Hans Richter, Walter Ruttmann and Lotte Reiniger.

The transition of the Weimar cinema to Nazi cinema was influenced by modernism.

Another contributory to the German cinema's success was its sound technology which replaced most of the silent films." [Expanded Academic Index] "The recent expansion of the German film industry is not merely a market effect of globalization, but also involves a process of conscious transnationalism.

The fundamental premise of the national film industry has altered in a subtle yet important way: Industry experts no longer speak of German directors creating German films, but rather of a film as " made in Germany" or from "location Germany." The shift from "made for Germans" to "made in Germany" leads to products that sidestep apprehension by national-oriented approaches.

This genre involved Germany's own attempt to come to terms with the war and Nazism, and the film reached back past the vulgarity and kitsch of Nazi film to the period of classical German cinema of the 1920s, the Expressionist era, where the crooked streets and painted shadows of Expressionism have become reality in Germany's ruined cities.

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