Red deer horny phone chat free trals - Dating a fender custom shop guitar

Consequently, some 1990 guitars bear 1999 “N9” serial numbers. American Deluxe Series instruments use the same dating convention, but with the addition of a “D” in front of the “Z”; i.e., DZ1, DZ2, etc.

“Z”-prefix serial numbers denoting the new millennium appeared on U. As always, there is typically some number prefix overlap and carryover from year to year.

Only the seven-digit suffixes were actually entered into the database.

dating a fender custom shop guitar-77

Neck-dating can be useful in determining the was produced, rather than the complete instrument.

Given the modular nature of Fender production techniques, an individual neck may have been produced in a given year, then stored for a period of time before being paired with a body to create a complete guitar, perhaps, for example, in the following year.

These markets operate completely independent of the new-instrument market.

If, however, you’re interested in determining a relative value for your instrument(s), we recommend that you contact used or vintage instrument dealers in your area.

Notice that there is quite a bit of overlap in numbers and years.

The only way to try to narrow the date range of your specific instrument is to remove the neck and check the butt end of the neck heel for a production date, which may be stamped or written there (if you’re uncomfortable doing this yourself, please refer to an experienced professional guitar tech in your area). Serial numbering didn’t change immediately because instruments continued to be made using existing, tooling, parts and serial number schemes.

Z3 5 or 6 digits Z4 5 or 6 digits DZ4 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate) XN4 4 digits Z4 5 or 6 digits Z5 5 or 6 digits DZ5 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate) XN5 4 digits Z5 5 or 6 digits Z6 5 or 6 digits DZ6 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate)XN6 4 digits Z6 5 or 6 digits Z7 5 or 6 digits DZ7 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate)XN7 4 digits Z7 5 or 6 digits Z8 5 or 6 digits DZ8 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate) XN8 4 digits Z8 5 or 6 digits Z9 5 or 6 digits DZ9 5 or 6 digits (American Deluxe) V 5 or 6 digits (American Vintage Series except ’52 Telecaster, which uses a five-digit number stamped into the bridge plate) XN9 4 digits A new serial numbering scheme was adopted toward the end of 2009 using the number “10” as a prefix, followed by a space, followed by seven digits.

The “10” prefix was designed to identify the first year of the second decade of the new millennium, and while it appears on the instrument decals, it was not captured in Fender’s operating system.

Most notably, production dates have been penciled or stamped on the butt end of the heel of the neck of most guitars and basses, although there were periods when this was not consistently done (1973 to 1981, for example) or simply omitted.

instrument production history, production dates have been applied to various components.

Instead, the instrument's country of origin appears on the decal on the back of the headstock, near the serial number.

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