Dating standards 2016

Even the behaviors within dating appear to be rapidly changing over time.Behaviors such as holding hands and kissing in public, which may been somewhat taboo only a few decades ago, in China, are now becoming increasingly commonplace (Xia and Zhou ) reports that over one third of college students in China had become sexually active while enrolled in school.For sons, in particular, “xiao” makes finding a spouse a priority and consequently makes dating take on a different quality.

Hence, individual choice within dating relationships and mate selection processes is more likely to occur within individualistic cultures.

Collectivistic cultures prompt young adults to regard love and romantic relationships within the larger context of their familial and societal obligations (Yang ).

This involves, especially for sons, the care for parents in their elderly years (see Ho ).

Understandably, this places great pressure upon unmarried sons to negotiate with his parents over the identification and selection of a suitable wife, who, in turn, will also provide assistance to his aging parents.

This, then, may lead young adults within collectivistic cultures to emphasize the pragmatic functions of dating and eventual marriage, while having less concern with notions of “love” and “romance” (Hsu ).

The post-Mao Chinese government has steadily encouraged economic modernization and the development of economic practices based upon free market principles similar to those found in Westernized countries.

Using a foundation of social exchange theory, the analyses illustrate the differences between the dating attitudes and expectations of Chinese women and men.

Per traditional expectations, both sexes place a low priority on sexual behaviors, yet more progressive attitudes and behaviors are also evident.

While researchers have long examined the dating and mate selection patterns among young adults, the vast majority have utilized Western samples.

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